We’ve all seen many like it: a car accident happens and both parties shout and fight each other. While you might feel better shortly, it’ll be followed by feelings of regret and guilt. Maybe you said something very offensive, or hurt someone. Even worse, all that didn’t get you anywhere and only made the problem worse.

Yes, in this case, anger got severe, but so can other emotions. Anyone can feel overly anxious, sad, and stressed. Having the ability to help others control their emotions can make all the difference.

Keep Yourself Calm

It’s easy to feel defensive when others get rowdy with you. That’s why you must keep yourself under control. You can’t help others if you can’t help yourself. In the heat of the moment, take some deep breaths, and be grateful.

In 2019, road rage involved 82% of drivers in America. If you find yourself angered, 62% of U.S. drivers recommend you listen to music. To avoid trouble, avoid eye contact, ignore inappropriate gestures and get away from them.

Listen

Assuming you can keep your cool, focus on them. In general, those upset will feel heard. As a result, angered people won’t feel the need to speak aggressively. By listening, you’ll understand their point of view and see what’s bothering them.

Support Them

Being present by their side is all that’s needed. You can further comfort those suffering by showing them that you understand them. For example, you can say, “No wonder you’re so anxious” or “You look sad, is there anything I can do to help?”. On the other hand, don’t judge one based on how they feel, as that’ll only escalate the problem.